Friday, April 24, 2015

Margaret Atwood gets 'bagelized'

 
 
by staff writer with agencies
----------------
VIDEO:
https://climateimagination.asu.edu/

PHOTO here of HCC tudent noshing on any everything bagel:
http://pcillu101.blogspot.tw/2015/04/the-everything-change-bagel.html
--------------------------

Everyone knows what an "everything bagel" is, and if you don't it's time to Google it both as a news item and a photo image so you can see the round bread with a hole in it up close and personal.
Unlike a "pizza with everything," the "everything bagel does not come with cheese toppings and pineapple bits and tomato sauce and everything else you can stuff on the top of a pizza pie. No, the "everything bagel" is just a plain bagel -- did I say ''plain''? -- with a variety of seeds on the surface: poppy seeds, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, pine nut seeds, even seeds you never heard of.
Don't take my word for it. Google the image first.
Now the story at hand, ''mit a schmeer,'' as they say in the old neighborhood of Avenue J in Brooklyn where my dear father was raised in the 1920s.
I was merely minding my own business the other day, when an email wormed its way into my inbox, and it was from Professor Elizabeth (nee Berg) Trobaugh at Holyoke Community College in western Massachusetts telling that in a few minutes she was headed over to her classroom to teach that week's session of her "cl-fi" literature and science class along with co-teacher Steven Winters.
''So what time is it where you are?" Trobaugh's email started off. "Here it's 9:15 a.m. and I meet my cli-fi
class in 15 minutes. I'm bringing some 'everything bagels' and shmear as I always do on
Thursdays. They like food. So do I."
 
Now to be honest, living as I do over here in bagel-less Taiwan, I had never heard of this term -- "an everything bagel" -- before. Blueberry bagels, yes, banana bagels, yes, cinnamon bagels, yes, but "everything bagels"?
 
I asked the profess for an explanation. She went one step further, even better, and sent me a photo of one of her students noshing on an "everything bagel." I was astounded. What a piece of work that kind of bagel is! Splendid!
 
So as I as looking at the photo and repeating that new bagel variety's name in my brain over and over, I suddenly remembered that Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood had recently coined a new term for climate change, telling an audience at a lecture at Arizona State University that climate change was such a huge issue that maybe it should be called "everything change" instead.
 
So I impulsively decided to dub the bagels in Professor Trobaugh's cli-fi class as "everything change bagels" and sent her an email to that effect. She said she loved it. Then I wrote a letter to Atwood and told her that a babel had now been named after her cool coinage of "everything change."
I told her I liked the coinage and wanted to name a bagel after it and call it an "Everything Change Bagel" in her honor, and could she tell me more. Ten minutes later, an email popped into my inbox.
 
"It's 'everything change' especially because climate change is changing everything," Atwood told me, adding: "Everything is changing: crops, droughts, floods, food availability, heat waves, wind events, sea-level rise, sea acidity, what grows where, what can live where, spread of disease, extinctions, and how we Will live, eat, get our energy, view morality. Everything."
 
It took me a while to digest all that but I believe Atwood is right on the mark. She also said she liked the new bagel name I had come up with in her honor, although she whispered: "What kind of mischief are you up to now?"

"There are two books everyone should read," she said, getting serious again. "'Art and Energy' by Barry Lord and 'Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels' by Ian Morris. And on we roll."

"Note that the Canadian government, which is very oil-driven, recently brought down a national budget that does not once mention the term 'climate change'," she told me.
 
I guess if the Canadian government does not mention the words "climate change" in its budget proposals then climate change must not exist up there, above the Lower 48 line.
 
Well, hoping to place the "everything change bagel" into the Internet's memosphere, I sat down and wrote a poem, with a tip of the hat to Dr. Seuss, of course. And I'm hoping to read it on air on NPR if Scott Simon will interview me for Weekened Edition one day.
It's titled "A poem to celebrate the Everything Change Bagel and its arrival on the world bagel-noshing stage."
''Denial schlimial, everything change/
The everything change bagel is very delish/
Try one today, with a deli shmeer/
With an everything change bagel/
There's nothing to fear.''
And after you eat your very last nosh,
Remember to preserve this very good Earth (oh gosh).
 
 
There's more but you'll have to wait for my on air appearance on NPR to hear the full three stanzas.
 
In the meantime, Margaret Atwood has been "bagelized."

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Paolo Bacigalupi and Alice Robinson, co-winners of the international literary award for a cli-fi novel in 2015.

 
 
'The Nevils' recognize 2 top noted 'cli fi' novels of 2015

by staff writer with agencies

The two 2015 winners of 'The Nevils',
(Noted Cli-Fli Novels Of The Year)," have been announced the winnters are this year
in two separate world continents and countries.

Paolo Bacigalupi and Alice Robinson, co-winners of the international literary award for a cli-fi novel in 2015, are from the USA and Australia. respectively, for their cli fi novels THE WATER KNIFE and ANCHOR POINT.

These awards honour new cli-fi (climate-change fiction) authors and
books each year, according to the Neviils oranizers.

The awards prgram was set up in 2014 by climate activist DanBloom, who coined and popularized the phrase 'cli-fi' as a genre term.  and is devoted to making the
literary genre a worldwide success.

''The Nevils'' are named after Nevil Shute, for his famous novel "On
The Beach" -- first published in 1957 and warning the world about the
dangers of nuclear war and nuclear winter.

Bloom says he came up with
the idea for ''The Nevils'', naming them after Mr Shute, and hoping to
inspire a writer to create one day a powerful cli-fi novel that will do for climate
change what the British-Australian writer did for nuclear war -- make
people give a damn, make people do something about it and make people
wake up to the call of a dangerous threat.

Still, climate deniers rage on against the realities and truth that
climate change is happening, and still people are not taking enough
action to stop global warming and the destruction of the environment
of Earth.

The disrespect, denial and constant destruction of nature
with activities like 'fracking' will be the end of our planet.

Maybe
these Nevils, these cli-fi novels, these ideas, these writers and the
hard work and effort of the organizers to create and promote the genre
of cli-fi, will help the situation. Let's hope so.

Among cli fi authors honored in 2014 were:

Hamish MacDonald in Scotland,
Mindy McGinnis in America,
Emmi Itaranti in Finland
Lloyd Jones in Wales,
Kate Kelly in the UK and
Antti Tuoamenin in
Finland.

The ''Everything Change'' Bagel

 

THIS JUST IN! Developing. MAJOR WIRE STORY prelim:

 
update npr news item
 
 
NOTE TO MEDIA REPORTERS: News Tip for a good news story with humor about climate change and one of the world's most important novelists, Margaret Atwood. Perfect news brief for AP, Reuters, CNN, BBC, AFP, dpa CBC, NYT, LAT and WAPO. HuffPost and Grist, too. SPREAD the news, no pun intended!
 
 
CAPTION: A student in Professor Trobaugh's cli-fi class at Holyoke Community College noshes on an EVERYTHING BAGEL on a recent morning before class begins, a bagel which has now been redubbed as the ''EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL.''
 
 
 
A poem to celebrate its arrival on the world bagel-noshing stage
 
"Denial schlimial, everything change,
The everything change is very delish.
Try one today, with a deli shmear...
With an EVERYTHING CHANGE,  there's nothing to fear'


"Denial schlimial, everything change,
The everything change is very delish.
Try one today, with a deli swish.

With an EVERYTHING CHANGE, there's something to kiss.'


'Pisher misher. everything change
The everything change is very delish.
Try one today, with a deli swish.

With an EVERYTHING CHANGE, there's someone to kiss.'

And after you eat the very last nosh,
remember to PRESERVE THIS GOOD EARTH, oh gosh!

==================================================


AN EXPLANATION THAT NEEDS NO EXPLANATION:

In a world full of bagels, meet ''THE EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL'', named in honor of Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood, who coined the term ''EVERYTHING CHANGE'' recently as a way of saying that in her opinion the old ''CLIMATE CHANGE'' term is limiting since we really need to change EVERYTHING to solve the Earth issues we are facing, so in honor of Dr Atwood, we have branded this new kind of world bagel -- yes, a global bagel! --as THE EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL. Yes, it's an ''EVERYTHING BAGEL'' as you can see in the photo here but it has now be redubbed as an EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL and we hope you will enjoyu wating them in the future, in whatever country we live in, even if bagels are not available there yet.
 
https://climateimagination.asu.edu/


The coinage belongs to Margaret Atwood. The bagels belong to everyone everywhere.

Take a bite of an EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL and your life will never be the same again!

 
 
NOTE:
Please send to this blog page address --  or to bikolang@gmail.com [Our Chief Bagel Bakery Maven, "biko lang" is Yiddish for "with a shmeer of cream cheese"]  -- your own ''selfies'' of you and your friends or classmates eating an  EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL and please I.D. the people in the photo either with their real names or if you wish with pen names or pseudonyms ...humorus pen names welcome too. And we will publish here.

This page was created after dreaming of an EVERYTHING CHANGE BAGEL and later B-blogged (Bagel-blogged)  by:

''Leinad Moolb''

a pen name
 
=============



BACKSTORY:

Professor Elizabeth Trobaugh at Holyoke Community College in Western Massachusetts team teaches a cli fi class this semester with Professor Steven Winters. Dr Trobaugh told me in a recent email that"

''So what time is it where you are? here it's 9:15 am. I meet my cli-fi class in 15 mins. I'm bringing bagels and shmear as I always do on Thursdays. They like food. So do I!"

I asked her if she could take a photo for my blog. She did:

"Okay I'll take a "selfie" of a bagel. The favorite in the class is the ''everything bagel''..."
 
THAT LAST REMARK GOT ME TO THINKING of MARGARET ATWOOD's recent coinage of ''EVERYTHING CHANGE.'' So I went into action and named this new kind of bagel in her honor. and SHE DESERVES IT!

 


===================================================
NEWS ITEM:

Margaret Atwood gets 'bagelized'
 
by staff writer with agencies
--------------------------

BAGEL CENTRAL -- Everyone knows what an "everything bagel" is, and if you don't it's time to Google it both as a news item and a photo image so you can see the round bread with a hole in it up close and personal.
Unlike a "pizza with everything," the "everything bagel does not come with cheese toppings and pineapple bits and tomato sauce and everything else you can stuff on the top of a pizza pie. No, the "everything bagel" is just a plain bagel -- did I say ''plain''? -- with a variety of seeds on the surface: poppy seeds, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, pine nut seeds, even seeds you never heard of.
Don't take my word for it. Google the image first.
Now the story at hand, ''mit a schmeer,'' as they say in the old neighborhood of Avenue J in Brooklyn where my dear father was raised in the 1920s.
I was merely minding my own business the other day, when an email wormed its way into my inbox, and it was from Professor Elizabeth (nee Berg) Trobaugh at Holyoke Community College in western Massachusetts telling that in a few minutes she was headed over to her classroom to teach that week's session of her "cl-fi" literature and science class along with co-teacher Steven Winters.
''So what time is it where you are?" Trobaugh's email started off. "Here it's 9:15 a.m. and I meet my cli-fi
class in 15 minutes. I'm bringing some 'everything bagels' and shmear as I always do on
Thursdays. They like food. So do I."
 
Now to be honest, living as I do over here in bagel-less Taiwan, I had never heard of this term -- "an everything bagel" -- before. Blueberry bagels, yes, banana bagels, yes, cinnamon bagels, yes, but "everything bagels"?
 
Iasked the profess for an explanation. She went one step further, even better, and sent me a photo of one of her students noshing on an "everything bagel." I was astounded. What a piece of work that kind of bagel is! Splendid!
 
So as I as looking at the photo and repeating that new bagel variety's name in my brain over and over, I suddenly remembered that Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood had recently coined a new term for climate change, telling an audience at a lecture at Arizona State University that climate change was such a huge issue that maybe it should be called "everything change" instead.
 
So I impulsively decided to dub the bagels in Professor Trobaugh's cli-fi class as "everything change bagels" and sent her an email to that effect.
 
 She said she loved it. Then I wrote a letter to Atwood and told her that a babel had now been named after her cool coinage of "everything change."
 
 
I told her I liked the coinage and wanted to name a bagel after it and call it an "Everything Change Bagel" in her honor, and could she tell me more. Ten minutes later, an email popped into my inbox.
 
 
"It's 'everything change' especially because climate change is changing everything," Atwood told me, adding: "Everything is changing: crops, droughts, floods, food availability, heat waves, wind events, sea-level rise, sea acidity, what grows where, what can live where, spread of disease, extinctions, and how we Will live, eat, get our energy, view morality. Everything."
 
It took me a while to ''digest'' all that but I believe Atwood is right on the mark. She also said she liked the new bagel name I had come up with in her honor, although she whispered: "What kind of mischief are you up to now?"

"There are two books everyone should read," she said, getting serious again. "'Art and Energy' by Barry Lord and 'Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels' by Ian Morris. And on we roll."

"Note that the Canadian government, which is very oil-driven, recently brought down a national budget that does not once mention the term 'climate change'," she told me.
 
I guess if the Canadian government does not mention the words "climate change" in its budget proposals then climate change must not exist up there, above the Lower 48 line.
 
Well, hoping to place the "everything change bagel" into the Internet's memosphere, I sat down and wrote a poem, with a tip of the hat to Dr. Seuss, of course. And I'm hoping to read it on air on NPR if Scott Simon will interview me for Weekened Edition one day.
It's titled "A poem to celebrate the Everything Change Bagel and its arrival on the world bagel-noshing stage."
''Denial schlimial, everything change/
The everything change bagel is very delish/
Try one today, with a deli shmeer/
With an everything change bagel/
There's nothing to fear.''
 
And after you eat your very last nosh,
Remember to preserve this very good Earth (oh gosh).
 
There's more but you'll have to wait for my on-air appearance on NPR to hear the full three stanzas. In the meantime, Margaret Atwood has been "bagelized." Nosh away, all ye who love everything bagels!

SCI FI mag embraces ''cli fi'' RE: [SF/F/H Link Post] Cli-Fi, Star Wars Yarns, Ten Essential Utopias,

SCI FI mag embraces RE: [SF/F/H Link Post] Cli-Fi, Star Wars Yarns, Ten Essential Utopias,

 

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

As Cli-Fi gathers steam worldwide, where do we go from here? - OPED column - ''START MAKING CLI-FI''

 
From the New Yorker magazine's Dana Goodyear to the New Republic's Sarah Kollmorgen, "cli-fi" is on everyone's lips these days, and after two years of sold PR work, 24/7 without one day off in 800 days, cranking out press releases, email blasts, twitter blasts and direct mail queries all after the famous NPR story by Angela Evancie went viral in April 2013...... now what?

Sure, cli-fi has entered the vocabulary. Scott Thill did an important piece at HuffPost: CLI FI IS REAL. From the NYT to the FT in the UK, from the Guardian to the Sydney Morning Herald, from Reuters 7 part series by Kyle Plantz to Tamara Lush's AP story  on the cli fi movie awards, the cli fi meme has found a place in the culture. It took a while, and there's still a long way to go.

But cli-fi has arrived.

Now what?

Well, in fact, the cli fi term itself is not all that important. What is next, what lies ahead, is this:

The cli fi term will lead to WRITERS and NOVELiSTS and Movie DIRECTORS making cli fi movies and novels and with publishers accepting the term and publishing CLI Fi novels as well.
So the next step, the BIG AND FINAL STEP, is for writers and editors and publishers and Hollywood players to START MAKING CLI-FI.

Yes, START MAKING CLI-FI.

START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.


That is all this PR effort was ever all about. To START MAKING CLI-FI.

So it's mid-2015, and by 2020 there should be some progress made with all this.

2025?

2030?

2050?

THESE THINGS TAKE TIME.

But it's time now tp START MAKING CLI-FI.

START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.
START MAKING CLI-FI.

As cli-fi enters college classrooms nationwide, course descriptions abound

 
 
 
This class will exlore some of the ways in which literary writers have developed scientific ideas and scientists have expressed themselves through creative writing.
 
CLASS SESSIONS: In 2013, Margaret Atwood joined a growing number of writers and critics and PR and MEDIA teams to exercise the term “cli-fi,” short for “climate fiction,” to describe an emergent literary genre that depicts a “challenging landscape that no longer resembles the hospitable planet we've taken for granted.”

While global in its consequences, climate change remains difficult to “see” in any straightforward sense, making literature about climate change all the more important for communicating stories of the people, places, and creatures affected by a warming planet. Even so, does the emergence of “cli-fi” as a named genre suggest increased public interest in the topic of climate change from a scientific or literary perspective? And what responsibility does literature have to engage climate change in the first place?

To address these questions and others, this course will study several texts in the growing body of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction inspired and incited by climate change. By pairing literary texts with recent work in the field of ecocriticism, we will ask how literature contributes to and is influenced by current conversations in environmental science as well as ethics, politics, and public activism. Throughout, we will also ask what might make ''cli-fi'' aka “climate-change fiction” unique as a genre, as well as what counts as climate change literature more generally.

Readings will include fiction by Barbara Kingsolver, Ian McEwan, and Lydia Millet, poetry by W.S. Merwin and Emily Hinshelwood, and nonfiction by Bill McKibben, E.O. Wilson, Jon Mooallem, and Elizabeth Kolbert, among others

CLASS SESSIONS PART TWO:
Literary fiction has dreamed up many versions of the end of the world, but how is contemporary fiction dealing with the threat of climate change? This course will focus on works by contemporary authors including Margaret Atwood and Ian McEwan and ask whether 'cli-fi' imagines solutions as well as ends.

There have been many literary depictions of environmental disaster or the triumph of nature over the works of humankind from Mary Shelley’s The Last Man (1826) or Richard Jefferies’ After London (1885) to 20th-century works such as J. G. Ballard’s The Drowned World (1962). In our own time, the threat of climate change has promised to make some of these visions of a drowned or denatured world a reality. How far has the contemporary novel been able to encompass the sense of instability and imminent crisis which climate change brings? The novel has primarily focused on the subject of the human: human institutions, the individual and their place in society and so on. Can it also say anything about non-human forms of life?
 
Recently, the term ‘cli-fi’ has been used to describe a loose collection of novels which all touch on, or are concerned with, the context of climate change. Some works may be clearly campaigning or attempting to raise awareness about the current situation, while others may use it as a backdrop against which to talk about traditional novelistic themes such as selfhood and society. Additionally, many cli-fi novels may be closely identified with other genres, such as science fiction or the thriller, and so will delimit the discussion of climate change according to certain generic conventions. We will read some examples of climate change fiction and consider how genre, form and style have molded these responses.
 
Cli-fi often raises questions not just about its ostensible subject, but also talks to its readers about proof and belief, agency and action, hope and despair. As literary critics on this course, our job will be to identify the pressures which the topic of climate change places on traditional novel form and to analyse the effectiveness of the authors’ treatment of their theme. And, as people living through this particular historical moment, we may also want to ask how far these novels contribute to efforts to better understand our relationship with the planet and its ecosystems.
 
CLASS SESSIONS part 3:
 “Cli-fi: Science Fiction, Climate Change, & Apocalypse,” is an English course. Because the topic of our class is so deeply concerned with public engagement and issues that are important to society at large, we’ve created a student blog platform in an effort to extend our conversation beyond the classroom,
 
The purpose of the student blog is two-fold: first, to provide a space for us to share our work and interact with one another online. Second, to remind us that the issues we are considering in this course are of great significance, and that our role as learners, thinkers, and writers, is to think in public about the expertise we’re gaining along the way. In our age, thinking in public often means writing online—thus the blog.
 
 
Course Description: Recent years have seen the emergence of a new genre of novel: climate fiction, or “cli-fi” for short. Its nickname reveals its connection to the larger genre of science fiction, which has for over a century imagined alternative worlds and what it would be like for humans to live during and after apocalyptic events. At the same time, contemporary science has begun to understand the irrevocable interconnection between humans and the earth’s climate—to wit, the frightening fact that human beings have altered the climate itself, for now and for long into the future. Taking up the intersection of science fiction and the climate, this course will explore contemporary fiction (and some fiction from earlier in the twentieth-century) that depicts and/or imagines the impact of climate change. Our key questions will be these: how can something so gradual, so significant, and so mind-boggling as climate change be treated in literature? And can fiction help to alter our conceptions of the earth and our role in changing it?
 
Primary Readings (see complete schedule, with secondary readings, on our Readings page)


CLASS SESSSIONS PART 4:
Readings:
Week 1:
“A Fable For Tomorrow,” Rachel Carson
“Time Capsule Found on the Dead Planet,” Margaret Atwood
Week 2:
Global Weirding project
Week 3:
“The Ethics of Adaptation to Global Warming,” Kathleen Dean Moore
Week 4:
“An Athabasca Story,” Warren Cariou
Information on Warren Cariou
Photo essay on the Alberta Tar Sands
Edward Burtynsky photographs of Alberta Tar Sands
Top facts about Alberta’s tar/oil sands
Week 5:
Scott McCloud, Understanding Comics
Article on agriculture and climate change
Week 6:
“So Hot Right Now: Has Climate Change Created a New Literary Genre?”
Nathaniel Rich article on climate change and the novel
Week 7:
“Weather versus Climate” (Neil deGrasse Tyson explains)
Superstorm Sandy and “The Civilizing Power of Disaster”
“Haiyan, Sandy and Climate Change”
“Mapping Hurricane Sandy’s Deadly Toll” (New York Times interactive graphic)
Sandy: Anatomy of a Superstorm (2012 BBC documentary)
Weeks 8:
FutureCoast, voicemails from the future project
“New Climate-Fiction Game Sends Players Clues From the Future”
Interview with Future Coast creator Ken Eklund
Week 9:
Climate Stories Project
After Water, WBEZ Chicago Public Radio Climate Fiction Podcast
Selection from A Visit From The Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan

Other articles about “Cli-Fi”:
New York Times, Room for Debate: Will Fiction Influence How We React to Climate Change?
“Global Warning: the rise of ‘cli-fi’,” article from The Guardian
“College Classes Use Arts to Brace for Climate Change,” NYT article on cli-fi and the UO

Presentations/handouts:
Day 1 Presentation
Rachel Carson, Margaret Atwood presentation (weeks 1, 2)
Weeks 2 and 3, plot, narrator, character
Week 4, Alberta tar sands powerpoint
Week 5 PowerPoint (on IDP: 2043 and midterm exam prep)
Week 6, Odds Against Tomorrow
Week 9, FutureCoast

CLASS SESSIONS PART 5

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature by focusing on the emerging genre of climate-change fiction (popularly known as “cli-fi”). Throughout the term, we will be investigating how fictional texts can suggest new ways for thinking about climate change and even afford opportunities for imagining more just and resilient futures. That is, we will consider the question: how and why does fiction, and specifically literary fiction, matter in the context of climate change? To pursue such an investigation, we will analyze the specific formal and stylistic conventions of literary and cultural texts and situate those texts within broader debates and discourses—scientific, historical, and political—about climate change. Specifically, we will read a range of short stories and novels, analyzing how features like point of view, characterization, and figurative language enhance the effects that those stories produce on their readers. We will also compare these literary texts to radical forms of fiction—like multiple-authored graphic novels, podcasts, and even alternate reality games—and will thus consider the extent to which different cultural forms shape the ways that people see, understand, and relate to the world. Overall then, this course focuses on developing the necessary tools and skills for thinking, writing, and speaking critically about both literature and climate change.
**Please note: This course satisfies credits toward the Arts & Letters category general education requirement. However, these credits do not count toward the English major.

Learning Outcomes
This course is designed to help you learn key concepts and skills in literary studies so that you can engage fiction and climate change in meaningful, transformative ways. If you invest yourself fully, you should finish the course being able to:
  • Read, summarize, and analyze complex fictional texts with discernment and comprehension and with an understanding of their conventions—both formal and stylistic;
  • Draw on relevant political, historical, and scientific information to situate literary and cultural texts within wider debates and discourses about climate change;
  • Identify how literary and cultural texts complement or challenge other understandings of climate change;
  • Reflect on and critically analyze your own understandings of and feelings about climate change and the future;
  • Employ logic, creativity, and interpretive skills to produce persuasive and imaginative arguments about literature, culture, and climate change;

Required Texts & Materials
The following texts and materials are required for this course. All other readings listed on the schedule will be posted on our course blog site.
  • Maslin, Mark. Climate Change: A Very Short Introduction, Third Edition. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2014. ISBN: 9780198719045
  • McKibben, Bill, ed. I’m With the Bears: Short Stories From a Damaged Planet. London: Verso, 2011. ISBN: 9781844677443
  • Mina, Denise, ed. IDP: 2043. Glasgow: Freight Books, 2014. ISBN: 9781908754639
  • Rich, Nathaniel. Odds Against Tomorrow. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013. ISBN: 9781250043641
  • A dedicated lined notebook to use as a reading journal
  • When using a dictionary for this course, you should use the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), which is available online through the UO Library website: oed.com.libproxy.uoregon.edu
  • You will need to have an UO email address to access our course blog site and to receive course related emails and announcements. You should use your UO email for all course related correspondence.


Reading journal 10%: Keeping a reading journal will provide you an opportunity to write regularly and to practice the art of critical, close, and slow reading. You will use your journal as a space to keep track of your responses to the course readings as well as your evolving thoughts and feelings about climate change. In addition to occasional in-class entries, which I will assign on an as needed basis, you will write at least three entries outside of class every week corresponding to the three days of class, at least 300 words per entry. Occasionally, I will ask that you respond to specific prompts or questions in your journal entries. Throughout the term, I will collect your journals periodically and unannounced ahead of time. Thus, you need to bring your journal with you to every class session.

Course blog 10%: Throughout the term, you will contribute posts to our course blog website (four significant posts, at least 500 words each, over the course of the term), as well as respond to your classmates’ posts. The course blog will be a place for us to test out ideas, engage in discussion with each other outside of class, and share texts and materials not included on the course syllabus.





CLASS SESIONS PART TEN:
Themes of Literature: Contemporary Fiction and Climate Change

From first-time and best-selling novelist Edan Lepucki to leading authors like David Mitchell, Margaret Atwood, and Suzanne Collins, today’s many kinds of ecology-related fiction explore unintended consequences of our species’ conquest of planet Earth and of one another. The worsening climate crisis is becoming central to these literary speculations.

That crisis will continue to stimulate the literary imagination for the foreseeable future.
First we’ll look at science-based predictions to see just what our warming climate could have in store, good and bad, for the inhabitants of Earth and their descendants.

We’ll then concentrate on recent novels and stories, including YA, that most directly explore the possibilities of “cli-fi,” a new and promising genre that is still developing.

 Cli-fi focuses on climate threats, struggles for solutions, environmental justice, and the impacts global warming has and will have on the range of human experience and feeling, including what it means to be human.

 Finally, we’ll branch out to explore related speculative fiction where issues of global warming are important though not central, or where they seem to be absent yet remain a crucial dimension accessible through literary interpretation.

Here are the most important examples of the work from which course readings will be chosen and from which students will choose individual projects, though the final list of required readings remains open to adjustment and to future publications:

Bill McKibben, Eaarth!: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet; Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway, The Collapse of Western Civilization; T. C. Boyle, A Friend of the Earth; Ian McEwan, Solar (a top scientist spoils our chances); Daniel Kramb, From Here (love and activism in London); Barbara Kingsolver,Flight Behavior (the truth is alarming but can set one free); Nathaniel Rich,Odds Against Tomorrow (death, love, and survival in New York); Wu Ming-Yi, The Man with the Compound Eyes; Saci Lloyd, The Carbon Diaries 2017 (college, rock band, guy, world in chaos—how to cope?); Lepucki, California (yuppie family takes refuge in a strange village); Benjamin Parzybok, Sherwood Nation (a barista keeps parched Portland hydrated and leads neighborhood activists to declare sovereignty); Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Maggie Gee, The Ice People; Jeanette Winterson, The Stone Gods; Lydia Millet, Pills and Starships; Margaret Atwood, MaddAddam (the labor of post-apocalypse revival); Emily St. John Mandel,Station Eleven; short stories by such writers as Mitchell, Helen Simpson, Dave Eggers, and Zadie Smith.

CLASS SESSION 11:
The Great Question before us is: Are we doomed? The Great Question before us is: Will the Past release us? The Great Question before us is: Can we Change?"(Tony Kushner, Angels in America: Perestroika) In 2005, Bill McKibben called for more writers and artists to address the climate crisis, arguing that political action would be impossible without greater cultural engagement. Ten years later, anthologies, labels, and patterns have emerged, allowing us to consider an emerging canon of ‘cli-fi' literature and explore how the Age of the Anthropocene imagines the story of climate change. At once incredibly dramatic (exacerbating floods, droughts, and other extreme weather) and tremendously slow (with glaciers outpacing governments in speed), climate change presents particular challenges for storytellers. Examining a variety of forms (including plays, novels, films, and writing for children) we will consider how contemporary literature negotiates these and other challenges. What happens to science when it becomes embedded within stories? What are the tensions between presenting climate change as a story of intergenerational responsibility or one of global inequity? How is climate justice imagined by contemporary stories? How are new developments in literature (hyperlinked poems, video series, interactive websites) adapting to represent climate change? Our readings will focus on literature from the USA and United Kingdom, with additional readings from scientists, critics, writers, and activists from across the world. Each week we will focus on a different party in climate change's complex ecosystem, from the fossil fuel companies causing the climate crisis to the next generation of children reading and writing about climate change. Authors studied will include Barbara Kingsolver, Naomi Klein, Bill McKibben, Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner, Tom Chivers, Steve Waters, Tarell McCraney, and Vandana Shiva. We will also watch and discuss the following films: Beasts of the Southern Wild, The Day after Tomorrow, and The Island President.

CLASS SESSSION: 12
English professor T. Ravichandran in INDIA is seeking approval to teach a course analyzing cli-fi novels and films to "help identify and understand the driving forces causing ecosystem degradation", according to his course proposal.
The class would look at popular cli-fi books including Harry Harrison’s "Make Room! Make Room!" – which explores the consequences of unchecked population growth – and Jim Laughter's "Polar City Red", which looks at life in 2075 in Alaska.
Students would also watch movies such as "Interstellar", "Soylent Green", and "The Day After Tomorrow".
Ravichandran admits it isn't always the case that "cli-flicks accurately portray climate change".
"In fact, they get most of the facts wrong ... yet they serve a good purpose in presenting the facts in an exaggerated manner," he said.
"Cli-flicks give a much-needed shock treatment to those who refuse to act on what is so blatant .. There are already millions of scientific materials available on climate change yet they have not effectively reached a huge populace."






 

New cli-fi novel imagines CANADA lording it over a divided and diminshed USA in near future dystopia

 
 
NEWS RELEASE TO Canadian media editors, reporters, and website directors for CANADA NEWS STORY:

I've read a brand new cli-fi book, and set for release any day now, and it's not dull at all. In fact, it's a very good read, a page-turner and an important wake up call -- and readers in Canada will love it, and I think in America, too. But in the story, Canada lords it over a divided and diminshed USA in near future dystopia.

The story? The story takes place at an unspecified time in the future when global warming has made much of the Earth uninhabitable. But the result isn’t some Mad Max wasteland. Instead, the U.S., suffering from the heat, has broken apart into three small, weakened nations.
 
They are dominated by Canada, which has taken over Alaska and New England and transported the topsoil from the American Midwest to Canada’s newly temperate arctic regions. The American South is so hot that it is barely inhabitable, and is afflicted by savage, flesh eating bugs that have developed as a result of the climate change.
 
It’s broken up into a group of diminutive principalities that are obsessed by unrealistic and distorted ideas about restoring American power. 
 
The action involves an entomologist who is sent to the South by one of the three U.S. nations to deal with the bugs. He’s kidnapped and forced to work in a lab which is doing some mysterious research, and he then has various adventures among the crazed, vicious, and ultimately pathetic people in the South. 
 
One of them is a strange young woman who has written a more typical post-apocalyptic novel about a world suffering from climate change, which the main character reads. 
 
The first few chapters of her novel appear in the book, and highlight the contrast between this sort of fantasy and the “real” situation. 
 
But it also gives the main character a clue about how to get himself rescued by the Canadians.  The  Canadians destroy the remainder of the South in the process.
WANT MORE DETAILS? RSVP HERE in comments or email me at danbloom AT gmail DOT com and I can send you the TITLE of the book and a link to the author's website for the book.
 
COMING REAL SOON! A KEEPER!